Encouraging Self-Esteem in Loved Ones

Self-esteem plays a big part in your loved oneself-esteem’s recovery. After all, high self-esteem will help your loved one to:

  • Act independently and responsibly
  • Take pride in his/her accomplishments
  • Attempt new tasks and challenges
  • Better handle positive and negative emotions
  • And more…

Conversely, low self-esteem can prevent your loved one from working toward personal recovery goals and can even lead to relapse, if your loved one feels so badly about himself that he gives up and starts drinking or drugging again.

You can play a positive part in helping your loved one build or rebuild his or her self-esteem. Here are some suggestions to keep in mind:

  • Exercise with your loved one. Whether you go for a morning walk together or sign up for a yoga class, this will help encourage self-care, which is key to self-esteem.
  • Help your loved one find a hobby. Whether writing a poem, playing a musical instrument, or going for a hike, identifying an enjoyable hobby/activity is the perfect way to help your loved one feel more confident and happy.
  • Laugh with your loved one and encourage him to laugh at himself. People who take themselves very seriously are undoubtedly decreasing their enjoyment in life. A good sense of humor and the ability to make light of life are important ingredients for handling the ups and downs of sobriety.
  • Remind him that mistakes are okay. Especially when you go outside your comfort zone, you’re bound to stumble along the way.

Healing Families at Christian Rehab
If you or someone you care about is caught in the bondage of drugs or alcoholism, Christian Rehab Network can help. We help families to find faith-based drug rehab programs based in Biblical truth. To learn more, call today: 877-310-9545.

Tips to Prevent Relapse

prevent relapseExperiencing a relapse – or even multiple relapses – during recovery is pretty common, but it’s not inevitable. In fact, long before the first drink or drug use occurs, there are typically warning signs.

According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), when people who have had a stable recovery and have done well begin to relapse they may experience the following:

  • Anxiety
  • Nervousness
  • Forgetfulness
  • Inability to experience pleasure
  • Lack of motivation
  • Feeling slowed down or speeded up
  • Being uncaring
  • Avoiding others or isolating
  • Being obsessed with something that doesn’t really matter
  • Displaying of irrational thought patterns
  • Feeling unconnected to your body
  • Increased irritability
  • Increased negativity
  • Not keeping appointments
  • Changes in appetite
  • Restlessness

It goes without saying, then, that a smart relapse prevention plan should include your individual warning signs as well as your personal triggers. Many addiction experts recommend keeping a running list – and refining it as you progress in your recovery. If this isn’t your first slip, you may even want to go a step further and ask your family, friends, pastor and/or counselor what signs they’ve noticed in you prior to your relapse.

In addition, the SAMHSA recommends taking action with one of these tips to prevent a relapse:

  • Reach out to a counselor, pastor or sober friends or family members.
  • Remove yourself from the situation and take a walk around the block a few times.
  • Distract yourself with a healthy snack or a book or movie.
  • Ask your friends and family to stop you if you begin talking about the fun you had while drinking or using.
  • Make a list of the good things about your new life: better relationships, more success at work or school, healthier appearance, more hobbies, etc.
  • If you have already relapsed at least once, think of how it happened. What can you do differently this time? “Just be strong and say no” is not enough to handle the situations you will face, notes SAMHSA.

Aftercare for Lifetime Sobriety
Built on the same spiritual foundations as the inpatient facilities and detox services we offer, the use of outpatient drug and alcohol, mental health or other services can be used to help you develop relapse prevention strategies and build on the recovery you gained during rehab. To learn more, call today: 877-310-9545.

How to Find Strength in Recovery

strength in recoveryOf course, having confidence and being mentally strong will undoubtedly help you maintain your sobriety. But that doesn’t mean that it will always be easy to find or tap into your inner strength.

These tips may help you find the courage and strength you need.

  • Be patient and kind to yourself. Unfortunately, negative thinking can become yet another bad habit to break for many in recovery. With time, you can learn to turn negative chatter into positive thinking. Your first step: Remind yourself that recovery takes time and that there will be a lot of ups and downs and curves along the way.
  • Practice positive thinking. Believe it or not, you do have control over how you choose to view situations. For example, if you wake up feeling defeated or guilty about not meeting a recovery goal, you can make a conscious choice to accept those feeling and then move forward with your recovery plans for the day.
  • Avoid comparing yourself to others. Everyone’s journey toward recovery is different (and should be), so comparing your progress with the progress of your peer is counterproductive. Instead, focus on your own experiences, how far you’ve come and how much hope and good is ahead for you.
  • Lean on your support system. If you find yourself feeling like you can’t do this or that you are a failure, you need to talk with your pastor or addiction counselor. These feeling are perfectly normal but can be a slippery slope into relapse if not addressed properly.

Finding Strength in Christ
You’ll find that strength comes easily and your willpower is seemingly fortified by the presence of the Lord in your recovery process, and we are here to ensure you find a facility that leads you down his path and into sobriety for the rest of your life. To learn more about our addiction services, call today: 877-310-9545.