Talking to Your Kids About Prescription Drug Abuse

The best thing you can do as a parent amid the current opioid crisis is to talk ttalking to teens about prescription drug abuseo your teen about the dangers of prescription drug abuse. In fact, according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), kids who learn about the risks of drugs at home are up to 50 percent less likely to use drugs than those who are not taught about the dangers. And still only 22 percent of teens report discussing abusing prescription drugs without a doctor’s prescription with their parents, notes SAMHSA.

What’s perhaps more alarming is that more teenagers die from taking prescription drugs than the use of cocaine and heroin combined. Opioid abuse can come with some devastating neurological and physical consequences, including:

  • Dependence
  • Slower brain activity
  • Irregular heartbeats
  • Dangerously high body temperature
  • Heart failure
  • Lethal seizures
  • Risk of mental disorders like depression, anxiety or psychosis
  • Speech, vision, or hearing difficulties
  • Impaired cognition and motor skills
  • Poor emotional regulation
  • Inability to maintain relationships
  • Poor school work or job performance
  • Stunted emotional maturity

Prescription drug abuse also increases emergency room visits and suicide attempts. In 2009, more than 1 million emergency room visits involved the non-medical use of prescription drugs,  notes SAMHSA.

More Talking Points on Painkillers
Experts encourage parents to develop an ongoing dialogue with their children and to look for spontaneous, “teachable moments” to lay the groundwork for open, honest communication. Here are a few more tips to help your teen avoid opioid abuse.

  • Remind your teen that taking someone else’s prescription or sharing hers with others is illegal. Sixty four percent of teens say they have used prescription painkillers that they got from a friend or family member.
  • Encourage your teen to ask you or a doctor about the negative side effects of a prescribed medicine, how to watch for them, and what to do if a negative effect is suspected.
  • Ask your family physician to speak to your teen about the importance of proper use of prescription medicines.
  • Keep prescription medicines in a secure location, like a lock box, and get rid of old or unused medicine properly.
  • Monitor your teen’s use of the Internet, especially for any illegal online purchases.
  • Look for ways to get your child involved in sports, hobbies, school clubs, church and other activities that reduce boredom and excess free time.
  • Spend time together. Seek out activities that you and your child can do together.
  • Give your child lots of positive reinforcement so he has the confidence to stand up against peer pressure.

Christian Drug Addiction Treatment for Adolescents
At Christian Rehab Network, we offer a faith-based rehab for adolescents (ages 13 to 17). Our group and individual therapy, Bible study, pastoral care, and recreational recovery activities give adolescents age-appropriate strategies for coping with issues like depression, anxiety, low self-esteem, substance use disorders and social difficulties. To learn more, call 877-310-9545.

Could My Loved One Be a High-Functioning Alcoholic?

high-functioning alcoholicJust because someone holds down a good job, attends church and community events or has what seems like a healthy family life, it doesn’t mean he or she doesn’t have a problem with alcohol. So-called high-functioning alcoholics typically seem to have it all together on the outside – and may even hold high-power positions in the community and at work — but inside they are suffering from the physical and emotional effects of alcohol. They may even be struggling with such hallmarks of addiction as uncontrollable cravings, unsuccessful attempts to quit drinking and obsessive thoughts about their next drink.

Despite their best efforts at concealment, they’ll likely exhibit some subtle and not-so-subtle signs uncharacteristic of their sober selves. Here are a few to watch out for:

  • Denial: Listen carefully for excuses. For example: “I haven’t had any setbacks because of drinking.” “I have a great job and pay my bills, so I can’t be an alcoholic.” “I only drink expensive wine.”
  • Eating habits: Many high-functioning alcoholics use mealtimes as an excuse to start drinking or lose interest in food altogether.
  • Withdrawal signs: This includes becoming irritable, nervous or uncomfortable when he or she is forced to abstain from drinking.
  • Lack of control: A high functioning alcoholic won’t be able to stop after just one or two drinks — and will likely always have an excuse for just one more round.
  • Behavioral changes: For example, a mild manner person might act aggressive or a conservative individual impulsive while under the influence.

Christian Addiction Treatment For High-Functioning Alcoholics
Making the decision to seek help for your own addiction, or helping a loved one to decide to seek help for alcohol abuse, may be the biggest and most important choice of your life. Let us lead the way. To learn more about our Christian rehab, call today: 877-310-9545.

Why Christians Might Resist Addiction Treatment (And Why They Shouldn’t)

christians addiction treatmentFor Christians, the decision about whether to seek addiction treatment can be a difficult one. You may have convinced yourself that you don’t really have a problem or that you can will away your addiction through sheer willpower or faith. Or, perhaps, emotions like guilt and shame are stopping you from seeking treatment.

In fact, studies show that people who choose a faith-based Christian approach to addiction recovery are more likely to get (and stay) sober. Here we take a look at a few of these common roadblocks to treatment – and why they shouldn’t stop you from getting the help you need and deserve.

  • Willpower: Addiction isn’t caused by a lack of willpower, nor will willpower alone result in sustained recovery. On the other hand, you’ll find that strength comes easily and your willpower is seemingly fortified by the presence of the Lord in your recovery process.
  • Guilt and shame: Do you feel like you let God down or that your addiction put a wrench in your relationship with Him? There is a close relationship between guilt, shame and addiction – but faith-based recovery can help you escape these emotions. By becoming sober, you can ask for forgiveness, restore your faith and repair your relationship with God.
  • Fear of stigma: Do you suspect that others in the church community will judge you or label you “an addict”? Getting help and being open and honest about the realities of addiction is perhaps the best step toward breaking the stigma of addiction. It’s also a powerful way to demonstrate to others the profound impact that spirituality has in your life and in your recovery.

A Christian Partner to Guide Recovery
As a Christian in recovery, you must find your way back to the Lord before you can achieve a truly lasting recovery. The founding principle of Christian Rehab Network is that you should never have to walk that journey alone. To learn more, call: 877-310-9545.