5 Ways to Prevent Loneliness

Some people call addiction “the loneliness disease.” This is prevent lonelinessbecause loneliness can trigger alcohol and drug use – and it can also be an emotion that sticks with you well into recovery. It’s more than just feeling alone, however, it’s feeling that no one understands or cares about you – even when your loved ones are supporting and cheering you on. While these feelings are normal, they are also dangerous to your physical, emotional, and spiritual wellbeing and your long-term sobriety.

Now, for the good news: Overcoming loneliness is possible. In addition to working with your addiction counselor or mental health professional, you can ease these feelings with the following steps:

  • Take time for silence. Find some place of silence so that you can read, pray, meditate, listen and allow God to help you overcome these feelings of isolation and loneliness.
  • Lean on friends and family. Strong social ties have been shown to help with recovery and your overall health, so carve out quality time with loved ones. This is also the perfect time to make amends, if possible, and reconnect with the people who have been deeply hurt by your addiction.
  • Join a support group. Meeting others within the recovery community – whether online or in-person – will help you build a network of support and remind you that you’re not alone in your struggles to stay sober.
  • Find a hobby. Discovering or rediscovering a passion is a great way to lift your spirits and combat any feelings of isolation. This is especially true if your chosen hobby gets you out and about and aligns you with like-minded people.
  • Get involved. Whether you decide to volunteer or become more active in your local church community, giving back to others is a surefire remedy for loneliness. It will help remind you that you’re not alone and bolster your confidence by proving that you can have a positive impact on others.

Your Christian Partner in Recovery
The founding principle of Christian Rehab Network is that you should never have to walk the journey toward sobriety alone. We’ll help you find your way back to the Lord and achieve a truly lasting recovery. To learn more, call: 877-310-9545.

Could Your Child Have Failure to Launch Syndrome?

failure to launch syndromeFailure to launch syndrome, the term used to describe a young person’s inability to leave home and begin an independent lifestyle, is a growing epidemic.

In general, young adults with failure to launch will have trouble following through with opportunities and display an overall lack of goal setting. And, after failing to navigate college, they often find themselves out of sync with their peers and in constant conflict with their families.

A few more red flags:

  • Low levels of motivation
  • Inability to find or keep a job
  • Poor work ethic and inability to meet deadlines
  • Lack of vision for the future
  • Unwillingness to face responsibilities, such as paying bills or maintaining an apartment or home
  • Inability to manage chores or daily tasks
  • Inability to deal with stress or conflict
  • Poor decision-making skills
  • Low frustration threshold
  • Fear of taking chances

Co-Occurring Disorders to Watch Out For
Many teens and young adults with failure to launch syndrome also have problems with substance use disorders as well as mental health disorders, including:

  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Drug and Alcohol Abuse
  • Eating Disorders
  • Gaming or Internet Addiction
  • Learning/Attention problems
  • Mood Disorders
  • Personality Disorders

Not only do these severe mental health problems prevent a young adult from becoming independent and reaching their full potential, but also they become compounded with a co-occurring substance use disorder. And abusing drugs or alcohol certainly doesn’t help with lack of motivation, low self-esteem and an inability to cope with the life challenges inherent in an adult world.

Getting Help for Failure-to-Launch and Substance Abuse
Substance use and failure to launch can impact brain development in adolescents, disrupting social, emotional and intellectual functioning. Our Adolescent Christian Rehab can help your young adult develop the skills needed to live healthy and sober on his or her own. To learn more, call us today: 877-310-9545.

Talking to Your Kids About Prescription Drug Abuse

The best thing you can do as a parent amid the current opioid crisis is to talk ttalking to teens about prescription drug abuseo your teen about the dangers of prescription drug abuse. In fact, according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), kids who learn about the risks of drugs at home are up to 50 percent less likely to use drugs than those who are not taught about the dangers. And still only 22 percent of teens report discussing abusing prescription drugs without a doctor’s prescription with their parents, notes SAMHSA.

What’s perhaps more alarming is that more teenagers die from taking prescription drugs than the use of cocaine and heroin combined. Opioid abuse can come with some devastating neurological and physical consequences, including:

  • Dependence
  • Slower brain activity
  • Irregular heartbeats
  • Dangerously high body temperature
  • Heart failure
  • Lethal seizures
  • Risk of mental disorders like depression, anxiety or psychosis
  • Speech, vision, or hearing difficulties
  • Impaired cognition and motor skills
  • Poor emotional regulation
  • Inability to maintain relationships
  • Poor school work or job performance
  • Stunted emotional maturity

Prescription drug abuse also increases emergency room visits and suicide attempts. In 2009, more than 1 million emergency room visits involved the non-medical use of prescription drugs,  notes SAMHSA.

More Talking Points on Painkillers
Experts encourage parents to develop an ongoing dialogue with their children and to look for spontaneous, “teachable moments” to lay the groundwork for open, honest communication. Here are a few more tips to help your teen avoid opioid abuse.

  • Remind your teen that taking someone else’s prescription or sharing hers with others is illegal. Sixty four percent of teens say they have used prescription painkillers that they got from a friend or family member.
  • Encourage your teen to ask you or a doctor about the negative side effects of a prescribed medicine, how to watch for them, and what to do if a negative effect is suspected.
  • Ask your family physician to speak to your teen about the importance of proper use of prescription medicines.
  • Keep prescription medicines in a secure location, like a lock box, and get rid of old or unused medicine properly.
  • Monitor your teen’s use of the Internet, especially for any illegal online purchases.
  • Look for ways to get your child involved in sports, hobbies, school clubs, church and other activities that reduce boredom and excess free time.
  • Spend time together. Seek out activities that you and your child can do together.
  • Give your child lots of positive reinforcement so he has the confidence to stand up against peer pressure.

Christian Drug Addiction Treatment for Adolescents
At Christian Rehab Network, we offer a faith-based rehab for adolescents (ages 13 to 17). Our group and individual therapy, Bible study, pastoral care, and recreational recovery activities give adolescents age-appropriate strategies for coping with issues like depression, anxiety, low self-esteem, substance use disorders and social difficulties. To learn more, call 877-310-9545.